Mary and Geza
Collecting Motorcycles Is An Incurable Disease
Welcome
About Us
Mary's Bio
Our Trips
Geza's Bio
Our Life
Pictures from Our Trips
Pictures from Hungary
Our Motorcycles
Minutiae
Misc. Photos
1981 Yamaha 550 Maxim
1982 BMW R100RT
The Silver BMW
2000 Triumph Sprint ST
1994 BMW K1100LT red
"Big Blue"
2001 Kawasaki Vulcan 500
2004 Suzuki Burgman 400
The Second Rig
1982 BMW R100RS
"Thunder"
"Lightning"
Our Motorcycles
1981 Yamaha 550 Maxim
Our neighbor, Steve Danberry bought himself a motorcycle in 1981.  I watched him wash and wax it religiously after rides and he spent a lot of time on and off the motorcycle.  I found myself looking in the mirror on morning remarking that I wasn't getting any younger.  I always enjoyed motorcycling and the sale of our first, a Benelli 50 cc "motorcycle" left a void.  After talking it over with Mary I selected a motorcycle to buy based on a TV commercial,  The chosen bike was a Yamaha Virago.  I fell in love with its swirl-design cast metal wheels.

We went to a dealer named Riff's in Langhorne, Pa and saw the 750 Virago in person.  It looked HUGE and intimidating to me, so a smaller model was selected: the 550 Maxim.  It had an inline four-cylinder engine and it had the same wheels as the Virago.  Sitting on it I felt comfortable, so a deal was struck: $3000 out the door with a Shoei full-faced helmet.

After picking it up at the dealer, which was located at the intersection of Route 95 and 1, an extremely busy road even then, I was faced with making a left turn on a four-lane road to go home. Mary had already left in the car. I didn’t think I had sufficient experience to venture across three lanes of traffic, so I chose to make a right-hand turn instead. Motoring along my self-confidence soared with each mile under my belt.
 
Next thing I knew I was miles from home with not a hint of wanting to go home and a few miles later I pulled into the driveway of Bob and Jane Schreiber, a friend and a colleague at the time. I showed off my new toy and as usual, they shared in my happiness and made me realize that Mary must be worried by now. I headed for home, my self-confidence now spilling over the brim. I was an experienced motorcyclist!
 
I came back down to earth the next day when my brother-in-law, Ty, my brother-in-law, asked me if I wanted to accompany him and some of his friends for a little ride to get a couple of their bikes inspected. It was early on during this ride that I failed to completely negotiate an s-curve and went off the road, barely avoiding being impaled by a bent-over sign-post. Ty saw the whole incident happening and was wondering how he was going to tell his sister how her husband died when, miraculously, I managed to avoid the obstacle and drove back onto the pavement. By the time I remembered that I should be scared, it was over and I tried to act as though nothing had happened.

I put 24,000 miles on that bike in a year and a half.  Over time I picked up some accessories for the bike, some nice, some even cheaper and not-so-nice looking.  The white Shoei handlebar fairing served its purpose but like the matching saddlebags, were quite ugly.

Both the coldest and second coldest time spent on a motorcycle were on this bike. The second coldest was the Lake Piseco to Lake Placid trip, when coming home in the dark we both froze our behinds off. The second was the trip to visit my cousin George in Bowie, Maryland in December. The trip was made on  a dare from Mary and as soon as the sun went down we were starting to get very cold. It was the very first time I put my own comfort ahead of Mary's and didn't give her a down vest I was wearing. We stopped at every rest stop on Route 95 on the way home just to warm up a little. My feet were the first to get really cold and then it was all over. I couldn't get warm until we got home and I was in the bathtub.

Some time later I found a dealer to install a factory fairing from the Virago on the Maxim.  It was color-matched and good looking.  It had a storage door in each side and the capacity was enormous.  Riding behind the fairing was eerily quiet, and all the noises eminating from the engine could be heard clearly.

One day Steve and I were on Route 220 in Pennsylvania, close to the New York border, saw a Honda motorcycle dealer and stopped to kick some tires.  Among the used bikes there sat a brown BMW R65 with a brown seat.  For some reason it really got my attention and  the search for my next bike started on that day.  It ended a few weeks later when I saw a left-over 1982 BMW R100RT in smoke-red on the showroom floor of Sellersville BMW in New Jersey.  I traded the Maxim for the BMW (I think he gave me $1,800) and a long-term relationship resulted.

 
1982 BMW R100RT
We bought the bike from Sellersville BMW for $6,000.  It was a leftover with an original MSRP of $7,200.

It was a beautiful smoke-red color with handpainted pinstriping in gold.  It had a full fairing with a huge windshield which was manually adjustable.  There were two adjustable air vents built into the fairing, which could be closed off for the winters.  The dash had a volt-meter and a clock.  Two detachable saddlebags were standard equipment and the bike weighed 478 pounds dry.  The gas tank held 6.3 gallons of fuel good for close to 300 miles.  There were two petcocks, each with a reserve setting holding a little more than a gallon.  It had great brakes for the time and the alternator put out 280 watts of power, plenty to add extra lights. The headlight was adjustable: You just reached down, grasped the headlight bucket and moved it up or down. The two cylinder heads served as efficient foot warmers and the passenger footpegs could be used on those extra-hot days.

When I got enamored with the Triumph Sprint ST, I sold the RT to our son-in-law Don who happily rode it for a couple of years.  When he bought a 1994 BMW K1100LT, a.k.a. "Big Blue", he gave me the RT back.

One bright Thanksgiving day Don, Steven and I went for a motorcycle ride. It was a clear, crisp fall day but it was chilly, so we bundled up. We were well over an hour into our ride and were traveling on Route 10, close to its Northern end, traveling south, Somebody needed to pull over, so we waited in a little clearing. We were ready, so I pulled out. The first curve was a left-hander and I was suddenly made aware of my sidestand being down because the bike wouldn't turn. I tried to break it by putting all my weight on it but it didn't. I ran out of time and I was heading for the guard railing, which was not Armco but strands of steel cable up to about three feet high. The bike and I went down and slid into the cables. I slid under the cables. I quickly jumped to my feet, looked at the bike and heart sank at the sight of mangled mass, once a great-looking motorycle. The boys caught up to me and after taking inventory of body parts, I was okay, for a sore right foot. My beloved Stitch was in need of repair and my pants had some openings on the side from road rash.

We wanted to call Mary to bring Steven's pickup to take the bike home, so I jumped on the back of Don's bike and we headed down to the nearest town. On the way we saw a police car heading the other way. We found a phone in a wide-open fire house and asked Mary to meet us. We then headed back to the site of the accident only to discover that it was crawling with people.  There was a police car, a wrecker and quite a few firemen. They couldn't believe I walked away from the wreck. They had been looking for my body over the embankment. The tow truck driver came all the way from Utica and wouldn't take a dime for his trouble. In retrospect, I was very lucky I wasn;t ticketed for something, if not for leaving the site of an accident. When Mary came we told her what happened and this way she didn't have time to worry.
The Silver BMW
A colleague led me to this one-owner 1971 BMW R60/5 with around 17 thousand miles on the odometer.  Its first owner was in the service and bought it in California, rode it back to Maryland, got married and didn't ride it much after that.  I borrowed the son-in-law's four-wheel-drive Ford pickup truck with oversized tires to bring the bike home.  The truck was extremely thirsty and tires noisy. 

The bike hadn't been started in years but once a new battery was installed and sparkplugs changed, it started right up.  I went to Stan's BMW shop in Doylestown for the parts and he had everything I needed.  Conversely, I happened to be in a Kawasaki dealership waiting for an inspection and overheard a customer asking for some parts for a 1971 vintage Kawasaki.  The guy behind the counter all but laughed at him.  Nothing the customer was looking for was available any more. 

On that same trip Don and I swapped bikes to let him try out the R60.  I forgot that when I parked it I tightened the manual steering head dampener and he almost killed himself.

I had stainless steel exhaust installed with less restrictive mufflers, electronic ignition, a new suade leather seat-cover and a cafe fairing from an R90S, complete with voltmeter and clock.  This bike is still the smoothest-idling bike of all we've had and its front wheel spins like a bicycle wheel.  It was always a bear to start in cool and cold weather but ran strong in the entire RPM range.

We had the bike for 20+ years until I heard of a man from Heid's whose father rode one just like it years ago and the son wanted to buy one to honor his father.  I fell for the story and, one day after another disappointment with the front brake, I decided to sell it to him.  Every once-in-a-while I regret my decision.
2000 Triumph Sprint ST

My riding partner, Steve in Levittown sold his 650 Suzuki and trailer, so I felt alone.  Riding a motorcycle is great fun but it's always more fun if you're not alone.  So for the last several years of our stay in Levittown my riding was curtailed drastically.  Then we moved to Upstate New York and even though I did explore some of the wonderful roads in the new area, the bike sat for long periods of time.  A BMW dealership, Bershire MotorWorks moved to Schenectady and I had them perform the necessary work to get it running better. 

Then the dealer became a Triumph dealer as well and I really liked the Triumph Sprint ST.  I did a lot of research on the Internet and I finally chose the ST over the Honda VFR.  The engine is an in-line three-cylinder, water-cooled, fuel-injected producing around 95 smooth HP.  The engine is so smooth that I oftentimes find myself happily motoring along in fourth or fifth gear.  The few times I measured mileage it was close to 50 MPG.

The riding position is a little uncomfortable after about fifty miles but a little rest-stop cures that problem.  The chain is slightly stretched in one spot, the gas gauge is almost unreliable but everything else is very likeable about this bike.  I call it my testosterone-maker, as it will do 95 in second gear, with Mary on the back.  Weeeeeeeeeee!

About ten years back I was to meet Steve in a motel outside of Watkins Glen. He hadn't seen the ST yet, so I chose it for the ride. I attached my textile saddlebags and packed them with my clothes and I was ready to leave when the bike wouldn't start. Disgustedly I transfered everything over to the BMW R60/5 and took off. Steve still talks about the ride we did once we met up. He was very impressed with the little 600, enjoying the exhaust note. Once I got home, the problem with the ST turned out to be loose battery connections.

1994 BMW K1100LT red
We bought this motorcycle in 2002 from a man who lived about an hour East of us. The bike had low mileage and was in excellent shape. Shortly afterwards we bought a black Hannigan Sport sidecar from BMW Motorrad of St. Louis for $4,250. 

By September of 2002 the sidecar was installed by Heid's. Mary and I went to pick it up. It looked neat with the Leading link front suspension shipped from England, along with two solid wheels at a thousand bucks a-piece. I reluctantly took it for a test drive. It was really strange, very different from riding a solo bike and I didn't like it. I kept picturing myself heading for the right-side ditch. I felt as though I was not in control. At the first opportunity I turned around and headed back. I was going to sell the thing on e-bay but I had to get it home first.

The Heid's were nice enough to lend me a bag of steel to be used as ballast. The old wheels and tires were also in the sidecar, as we set off for home. I was driving very cautiously at first but when I didn't go into the ditch, I increased the speed a little, up to an indicated 45 MPH. After about 4 or 5 miles I felt muscles in my shoulders and upper back and they were aching. I saw a rest area coming up on Route 8 and I pulled over. I was going to boast to Mary about my improved progress but she spoke first, asking me why I was going so slowly. My balloon was burst and so was my self-confidence but we motored home. During the long trip home I realized that my speedometer was way too optimistic due to the smaller diameter tires on the rig. By the time we reached home, I was close to doing the speed limit and felt much better about everything.

This was on a Friday afternoon and I was to meet my friend, Steve in Levittown, Pa on Monday night. The next morning we were to go down the Blue Ridge Parkway. The weekend before the trip I packed the sidecar full of everything I could think of. It was full of camping stuff, two sleeping bags, camping stove with extra fuel, chairs, lanterns, etc. It was heavy but I felt that the heavier the better for those right-hand turns.

I still didn't feel very comfortable driving on four-lane highways, so I took backroads and arrived very late. The next morning we did go to the BRP and then continued on to slay the dragon and I received a lot of looks from people while driving on that curvy road.  It was a great vacation.

The bike was red, the sidecar black, so I found a guy to paint the sidecar for me. I picked it up on May 15, 2003, an exceptionally bright and crisp spring day. I emptied the sidecar of everything for the occasion, so I had no ballast at all. I was nearing home on Jockey Street, preoccupied with enjoying the ride home and I was looking forward to taking pictures of the new rig. I arrived at one of my favorite curve on this road and I realized I was going too fast. I was afraid the sidecar was going to lift on this right-hander and I just froze. I crossed into the other lane, then into the ditch and totaled my new pride and joy. I fractured my elbow and put a big dent in my ego. I was never going to drive another sidecar rig.
"Big Blue"
"Big Blue" is a 1994 BMW K1100LT painted in silk blue #690. Son-in-law, Don, was kind enough to sell it to us in 2003 after the demise of our beloved RT. He, then bought himself his beloved GS Adventure.

The four-cylinder fuel-injected engine produces around 95 HP, along with a lot of heat, making it rather uncomfortable to ride in the summer time. Its heat is welcomed the rest of the year.

Its hefty dry weight of 695 pounds is getting heavier as I am growing older and it is difficult to turn around in the shed. There is a buzz felt in the handlebars, seat and heard from the fairing at diffferent RPMs, right up to a little above 7,000 after which it takes on another persona and becomes silky smooth. At this level it can be driven all day long, eating up the miles effortlessly.

We purchased a Bushtec Quantum cargo trailer at the 2003 Americade, including the trailer hitch. It is big enough to take everything along short of the proverbial kitchen sink. The longest trip it's been dragged to was a Moto Guzzi rally in West Virginia. We recently took it to our first BMWRA rally in Southern Vermont in 2010. I have kept a diary of these trips. On one of these we averaged 42 MPG.
2001 Kawasaki Vulcan 500 This is Mary's second motorcycle.  I was away on business when she excitedly called me to tell me that she saw a motorcycle she loved and wanted to buy it.  It was a 250 cc Suzuki GZ250X, a little cruiser-style one-lunger.  It was low to the ground and she could flat-foot it (very important to a new rider).  It could happily cruise around 65 miles an hour but without a windshield it was difficult to hang on the handlebars.  Of course this was only a problem to me because her speeds hovered around 50 on a staightaway and below the recommended speeds for a curve.  We both enjoyed this bike for a few months despite the very uncomfortable seat. 

Then one day she wanted to trade it in for something bigger, a Kawasaki Vulcan 500, also a cuiser-style bike.  It is a water-cooled twin engined bike, quite a bit heavier than her first.  We went on several rides in the beginning.  Even son-in-law accompanied us at first, ver patiently riding shortgun, with Mary between us.  Eventually the rides became sparses and she kept declining my offers for a ride and she hasn't been on it for two years now. Too bad she lost her enthusiasm she had at the beginning but I fully understand it.
2004 Suzuki Burgman 400
My friend, Steve, was coming up for a visit from Pennsylvania.  He used to be our neighbor and has been coming up once a year for a few years now.  This time, I told him on the phone, we're going to ride with another friend, Harold, who has a scooter.  Steve told me later that he was muttering to himself: "Why do we have to do this?  I want to go faster than 35 miles an hour!"

He arrived at the house and the next day the two of us rode over to Harold's house in St. Johnsville, NY.  The two of them hit it off right away (I knew they would) and after they were talked out, we mounted our rides: Harold on his Suzuki Burgman 400, Steve on his classic 750 Honda and me on "Big Blue".  It's worth mentioning that I had not ridden with Harold up to this point.

Harold was in the lead and all I saw was the back-end of the scooter squat down and then he was gone.  Steve told me later that he was laughing out loud in his helmet trying to keep up with Harold.  I, too, was quite surprised and it turned out to be a very pleasant ride.  We came to a gravel rod, Harold just kept going.  He wanted to turn around in the middle of a two-lane road, so he did.  I was sweating bullets under my helmet trying to tippy-toe Big Blue around and had to back it up once.

I was so impressed with that scooter I bought one not too much later and have enjoyed it ever since.  Thanks, Harold!

We don't ride it as much as we should but I always enjoy it when I do. My favorite day on it was the day Don and Catherine and I were riding in the Adirondacks at a rather spirited pace. We came upon a bunch of Harley riders, who were riding slower than we. In an annoying style every time a passing opportunity arose, they would speed up, making passing impossible. After a few times of doing this, a long enough straight-away presented itself and we blew by them all in a fell swoop. I was doing over 70 by the time the last guy fell victim to the big powerplant in the Bergman and I was hooting and hollering in my helmet for joy, hoping they saw and knew what just passed them. Coincidentally, I checked my mileage on that trip and even with the fast pace I averaged 68 MPG.
The Second Rig
After wrecking the first rig I was all set to be without another sidecar.  We lost over $9,000 and at least that much worth of self-confidence, self-pride, etc.  Then Mary piped up saying that she missed riding in the sidecar.  Another search was started, this time for a turn-key rig, preferably a BMW/Hannigan combo.

Soon I located a K75 with a Hannigan Sport sidecar in the Tallahassee, Florida area.  A deal was struck and off we went in the dark-blue Audi A6 to fetch it.  When I saw it, I was really disappointed.  It was dirty, it had many knicks the pictures didn't show.  The light-colored seat of the bike looked good from a distance but close-up showed the Florida mold all over it.  When I took it for another ride I pulled over after a few hundred feet: It handled no better than our first rig.  The old scary feelings of running off into the ditch or running into someone head-on returned and I told the owner I didn't want it and was ready to drive back.  He kept trying to talk me into it and finally lowered the price enough that I got back on and kept driving until I was comfortable again.

After the transaction was over we headed back home.  We ran into such a nasty downpour that I could barely see enough to navigate.  At one red light we waited for the green in the right lane with a car next to me, Mary behind.  The light changed and we all accelerated to the bottom of a little gully which looked like a puddle to me, so I thought nothing of it.  We were all powering through it when we reached the bottom, which was about a foot of running water.  The rig felt like it hit a wall.  I lost sight of the car next me, my left boot immediately filled up with water and thoughts of the engine stalling and Mary running into me from behind entered my brain.  Luckily it didn't happen but I still think the sidecar actually floated for a little bit.

Within the next half hour we were treated to a wonderful lightning and thunder show, which I would've enjoyed more, had it not been so close.

By the time we got home I felt totally comfortable with the rig but I wished I had that extra cylinder the first rig had.

We enjoyed that rig for many years and didn't experience many problems at all.  The in June of 2007 Mary and I attended the Americade rally in Lake George.  We were heading for Dave Hannigan's area when I saw a rig which grabbed me immediately.  It was Hannigan's latest offering, something they called a High-Performance Sidecar (HPS).  It was a Kawasaki Ninja ZX14 attached to a sidecar that stood a couple of feet shorter than the windshield of the bike.  It had huge car-type tires at all three ends and it looked like it was moving at a hundred miles an hour. 
1982 BMW R100RS
I had always wanted a smoke-red BMW 100RS.  When we bought the RT the dealer didn't have an RS, neither did any of the many dealers we've visited before we finally bought the RT.  So in 2002 I found a 1982 RS.  It was smoke-grey and its fairing was not installed.  We picked it up from a man in New Hampshire, who got me a temporary tag to drive it home on.  It was in March, so it was still very cold, especially without the fairing.  I did have an electric vest, which helped a lot.

Much time and money later the bike was repainted the same color as the 1994 K1100LT we had converted for sidecar use.  For some reason I didn't like it as much as I thought I would, so it didn't get ridden very much.  Eventually I decided to sell it and asked Bill Heid to sell it for me.  I felt guilty about that for some time.
"Thunder"
We bought Thunder at a Moto Guzzi, Benelli & MV Agusta dealer outside Utica, NY.  Owner Brad admitted his love for Italian motorcycles.  I read many reports on the Internet about the Norge, a sport-tourer.  The only common nit found was the windshield deemed to be too small.  There was a red Norge and a black California Special next to each other.  I sat on both of them and liked them both but, in the end, the red color won out and we selected the Norge.

This model gets its name from an event decades ago when a shaft-drive was installed in the current Guzzi. It was decided that to test its reliability it was to be driven above the Artic Circle. They ended up in Norway, which is Norge in Italian. That bike performed flawlessly and the rest, as it is said, is history.

Mary nicknamed the Norge "Thunder" when a Staintune aftermarket muffler was installed.  It sounds great! The bike, though has always had a problem but because the dealer was so far (and I'm lazy) I neglected getting it taken care of. The installation of the new muffler exacerbated this problem with the fuel injection. Driving at slow speeds the throttle acted as a switch, turning off then on, the engine hiccupping with plenty of driveline lash. I took it to one MG dealer in Massachusetts, who couldn't fix it but did recommend someone in Connecticut. We left it there while we went on vacation to Florida with the S2000. It ran better afterwards but it still wasn't as good as it should be - based on the rest of our bikes, such as the Triumph and the BMW.

There is a happy ending: Another dealer (MG, KTM and Ducati) was recommended and he was able to dial the FI in. Now it runs strong and I am enjoying it.
"Lightning"
I saw an episode of "Twist the Throttle" on HD Theater featuring Ducati.  The hour-long program showing the gorgeous Ducatis being ridden among the rolling hills of Tuscany tugged at the strings of my heart, so much so, that the next day I dragged Mary down to the Ducati dealer in Albany.  I looked them over, I sat on a couple and we settled on the left-over 1098 Superbike.  The salesman said he was expecting a yellow one next week, so I told him to call me and left with euphoric feelings.  The call never came.  I looked at it as an omen.

The next show featured MV Agusta.  This had the same effect on me, so I started to look at ones for sale on e-bay.  I've been doing this off and on for a couple of years.  Of the ones I saw my favorite was the F4 in blue and silver.  Someone had one for sale in Connecticut, offering delivery and I thought hard about it but didn't act on it.

A few months later another appeared, this one in New Hampshire owned by a "29-year-old single female with too many toys".  I watched the bidding for a while, read the two questions people had for her, waited a few days and made her an offer.  I was shocked when she immediately accepted it!  So I bought this bike sight unseen.

Son-in-law Don was gracious to drive me to Morgan's house to pick up the bike.  It was a rainy May day that we arrived.  Seeing the bike brought mixed emotions.  It was physically small with a very high saddle. I could barely touch the ground straddling it.  Morgan started it for me and it sounded awesome.

Don secured the bike to the trailer and we were ready to start back home in the rain.  Mary came out as we unloaded it and it wasn't long after that that she named the new addition "Lightning" to go with the Moto Guzzi Norge's "Thunder" moniker.

So, "Lightning" is officially a 2005 MV Agusta F4 S1000.  It is a "monoposto" or single-seater.  Its engine is afuel-injected 1000 cc in-line four-cylinder producing 166 HP, red-lined at 12,700 RPM.  The dry weight is 423 pounds and the observed top speed is 187 MPH.  It's awesome on paper but in real life it is even more so.  Morgan had a full "racing" exhaust system installed, along with a Power Commander, adding even more power and raucus exhaust note to the standard amount.

I got to clean it a lot in the garage while waiting for the title to be mailed to me.  This bike is billed as "Italian art" and I wholeheartedly agree.  It looks gorgeous from every angle.  Every piece fits perfectly and appears to be hand-made.  Despite bringing it home in the rain it wasn't dirty at all, so Morgan did a nice job of taking care of this bike.

After a week of looking and cleaning I finally got the itch and I took it for a little ride around the block.  This bike is FAAAAAAAST!!

Weeks have passed and it's legally registered. New York state has just released a new license plate, wich is rusty brown, a color that would clash with this bike. I was upset with this prospect but we lucked out and when Mary took it to get it registered, she was given a choice of the new and old plates. As the old ones were blue, she wisely made the proper choice and I was happy. Sometimes I feel guilty about the miniscule size of my insignificant problems but I thank God for it at the same time.

As of late I've been raising the RPM limit and the current high-water-mark is around 10,000 in second gear, at which level things happen at a very rapid rate and I found myself letting up.

In October 2010 I enrolled in my very first "track day" at Pocono Internation Raceway.  A track day is an event held on a racetrack during which you get to ride your own motorcycle as fast as you want or are able. 

We borrowed Don's trailer and hooked it up to the Honda, loaded and secured Lightning but not without several rookie mistakes and drove to the racetrack the day before the event.  We found a motel and were parking the rig when a couple of guys came ove to talk to us.  Turns out they were there for the same event and were enamored with the the whole setup: car, trailer and the bike.  We drove to the track the next day and I was totally surprised by what greeted us.  There were trailers (mostly enclosed) and bikes all over the place.  There were generators running to keep tire warmers operating, bikes were all on pitstands and people were all wearing leathers.

When I found a place to park and drove in (didn't want to back in) several neighbors came ove to talk to us.  One offered to help us unload the bike, saying that now he'll be able to say he pushed an MV Agusta.  The two guys from the night before came over and offered to show us how to better secure the bike for the trip home.

After unloading the bike on a chilly morning, the bike refused to start.  I panicked and went in search of a good samaritan, who was only a few yards away.  I told him I would be back wuith the bike but walking back I remembered the Christmas present from Don and Catherine. I used the portable battery and a screwdriver to successfully start the bike.

Then I had to go through tech inpection.  The taped-over headlights and turn-signal lights were okay and my front tire barely passed.  Then over to get fitted for my rented leathers, which shamefully advertised Suzuki but fitted me perfectly.  I used my own gloves and the freshly purchased Sidi motorcycle boots.  Then I had my suspension settings performed by a professional (there are three settings (preload, compression and rebound) each for the front and rear suspension) and I was ready for the track. 

Track day consists of 5 or 6 sessions on the track after a classroom instruction/discussion between each.  I was grouped with the novices and after being reacquainted with apexes and entry and exit points, still fresh enough in my mind from the Audi track days in Watkins Glen, we were let loose. 

I was excited but surpprisingly calm and I thoroughly enjoyed myself.  Many people passed me and I didn't pass a single bike but it was still a blast.  I would like to do it again but not on Lightning.  The seating position is very uncomfortable for a prolonged time.  The footrests are very high, the reach to the ground from the seat is long and the handlebars are low and forward making the task of holding your head up a little difficult.  Maybe I'll take the Triumph.
11 items total


Welcome
About Us
Mary's Bio
Our Trips
Geza's Bio
Our Life
Pictures from Our Trips
Pictures from Hungary
Our Motorcycles
Minutiae
Misc. Photos